Granada Part 1: Land of Tapas, Alhambra and Hammam

Charming, walkable, Alhambra, flamenco dancing, caves, Darro River, 45 minutes from the coast, and oh yes… and free delicious tapas with every drink. There is so much to love and appreciate about Granada that three weeks wasn’t enough so we decided to stay a whole month.

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That glorious thing behind us is Alhambra

Granada oozes Spanish culture, history, a rich food scene and friendly people. I especially was looking forward to this leg of our trip because I speak a solid amount of Spanish and if one thing has been limiting us on our travels, it’s when we don’t know the language well enough to communicate (on a basic level). That being said, Granada is in a region of Spain called Andalusia and we very quickly learned that Andalusia is known for its distinct and fluid accent, aka very difficult for me to understand. Although I was able to limp us along the first few days, my drive to learn the language better was intensified after not being able to communicate as well as I had hoped. After some googling, I enrolled in an intense 2-week program with ImSol, which consisted of 1.5 hours per day of spoken Spanish classes for conversation comprehension. My class was small (3-4 people) and completely in Spanish, zero English crutches. After two weeks, it did help slightly with my confidence to just speak as well as my acclimation to the speed and style in which the people in Granada speak. If anything, the classes and time in Granada ignited the drive in me to learn Spanish fluently because being able to communicate in another language opens up that many more people to communicate with and learn from.

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Our view along the Darro River on our daily walk home to our AirBnB

Tapas, tapas, tapas. We all know the word and I’m sure visions of delicious, small shareable plates are flooding your mind. However, tapas in Granada and Andalusia as a whole are special because this is where they originated. The OG of tapa culture. Although many explanations exist, we learned the term originally derived from a story where a piece of meat was promptly used to cover the King’s glass of wine to prevent insects and sand from getting in, an edible ‘tapa’ or topper. In Andalusia, tapas are gratis, or free, with every round of drinks be it alcoholic or not. We also learned thanks to the bloggers of the great internet, that tapas get better when you stay at the same restaurant or bodega for multiple rounds. Our 2nd and 3rd tapas were often so delicious we would play a game guessing how much it would cost in America, often $8-$12 per tapa in our minds WITHOUT the drinks. Not to mention good local wine is only 2-4 euro!

As you can imagine we did lots of tapa research… and also joined a gym. We probably only paid for a “real dinner” a total of 5-6 times in the month. Tapa crawling was a way of life.

  • Adams favorite tapa was at La Botillería: Veal pot roast and vegetables (3rd tapa)
  • My favorite tapa was also at La Botillería: Beef slider (2nd tapa)
  • Our favorite tapa close to our apartment was at La Hermosa, a brewery making a delicious beer called Sacromonte: huge and fresh homemade potato crisps, the *best* olives, and cured meat cubes with freshly made bread

Okay, now on to one of the most beautiful wonders of the city. Without a doubt, the most notable attraction in Granada is Alhambra, which I am embarrassed to say we didn’t know about before arriving which is a damn shame because we would have done a major history dig. If you haven’t heard of this majestic palace either, stop right now and pay a visit to Google images. Alhambra is absolutely jaw-dropping. It’s an impeccably preserved Moorish castle from the 9th century with more handcrafted detail than you could ever imagine. Not to mention its fascinating history of daughters locked in towers, secret caves, Turkish baths, and various dramatic conquests. Unlike most monuments or castles, Alhambra is in its own category. Adam and I spent about 4+ hours wandering around the massive complex admiring the attention to detail, security measures, grandiose and ingenious design. I could write an entire blog dedicated to Alhambra… and will if I ever get caught up on blogging.

Another great experience we indulged in during our time in Granada was the Hammam, or Turkish Baths. Now since these are private baths, I don’t have pictures because that would be weird, so I’ll have to use my words to paint a picture. However, if my words aren’t enough you could also visit their website which is completely worth it. In a lot of ways, the baths mimicked Alhambra with the tile work and attention to detail. I was really thankful we visited Alhambra before the baths as it gave us a richer experience because we knew more about the reason for the baths and style of design.

Upon arrival for our 10pm soak, called “emerge”, we were led to a calming waiting room thoughtfully decorated with exotic Turkish design touches and helped ourselves to mint tea in a beautiful ornate silver kettle, you know, to start the relaxing process. Then a staff member took each one of us back to our respected dressing rooms with little slippers over our shoes, where we walked through curtains of flowy linen with dim lighting, earthy scents, and tranquil music. Once changed, we entered the baths, yes with bathing suits. Historical and more traditional Turkish baths we learned were sans suits so there were no determining factors of class or hierarchy; everyone equal as God made them.

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The dreamy Hammam waiting room

There were roughly 30 people allowed in the baths at once for a 90-minute soak. Although that might seem like a lot, it never felt crowded because there were multiple baths and rooms; one warm, two hot, one cold, steam room, a hot stone to lay on, showers, and one room to just lay and pour water on yourself if it suited you. There were also hundreds of candles and delicious tea in more ornate silver kettles. I really liked the kettles if you can’t tell by now. Adam particularly liked the cold bath. And when I say cold, think ice bath. I was reluctant to ease into the frigid water myself, but once in, it really made you feel alive. Like every single nerve ending was electrified. The whole experience was incredibly relaxing and felt delightfully indulgent, despite its modest price. Hammam rules.

Okay, clearly we loved Granada because this blog is long and I haven’t even got to cooking paella in Malaga, hiking Los Cahorros, our co-working space, drool-worthy Iberian ham, or our weekend beach getaway to Nerja yet! Look out for Granda Part Two coming soon!

Cheers!

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Now that I have you drooling with our cooking adventure making paella — stay tuned for Part 2!

Author: curriedawaytravel

We're semi-newlyweds living in the great city of Cincinnati, except for this year as different parts of the world will be our home. Although different in our own ways, we both share common loves of cooking, the outdoors, volleyball, skiing, delicious food scenes, travel (obviously) and our awesome dog Bentley. Adam works as a Real Estate Agent with Keller Williams focusing on and passionate about investment properties. When he's not making calls, renovating homes around the city or building his local Key Property Partners team, you can find him on one of Cincinnati's many sand volleyball courts, year-round. In fact, he tried to bring THREE volleyballs on this 10-month trip (luggage limitations got him down to 2... I'll keep you posted on how he survives). Adam is also a foodie and loves ordering the strangest thing on every menu. If I had to sum him up in 4 words it would be: determined, practical, thoughtful and curious. I, the likely frequent author of this blog, am an environmental graphic designer for m+a architects. What that mostly means if you aren't familiar, is that I design environments that communicate information, a brand or a feeling. Installations, signage, wall graphics, custom art, and so on and so forth. It's pretty awesome work. When I'm not working, I'm usually putting my creative juices to good use and DIY'ing something around our newly renovated home or sending Adam pictures of adoptable dogs. I love otters, wine tastings, a good charcuterie board and keeping an active lifestyle. Adam's summary of me in four words is: enthusiastic, determined, adventurous, and athletic (finally, he admitted it!)

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