In Napoli Beside the Sea

A post (mostly) by Adam!

When we put the plan together to visit Italy, there were a lot of factors we considered when choosing where to stay. Since it was summer aka. high tourist season, prices had skyrocketed in the locations typically considered “the most beautiful parts of Italy”, so we were forced to prioritize our criteria to find the best location. Our criteria included: a coastal location, co-working space, nearby gym, good walkability, and convenient public transportation. After research and weighing our options, it became clear Naples was going to be our base for a month. Despite the stereotypes we’d heard regarding cleanliness, safety and the mafia rule, what intrigued us about Naples was that it was a city with grit. We’ve been to picturesque Italy; it’s exciting, charming and touristy for good reason. But how those on vacation experience Italy isn’t how locals live and we wanted a taste of that local Italian life… la dolce vita… and a lot of blogs pointed us to Naples.

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Impressive right?

People are quick to point out the negative aspects about Naples, but Italy’s 3rd largest city has a lot of great things going for it. First and foremost, pizza was invented in Napoli meaning they arguably have the best pizza in the world. Second, it’s a port city and a major train hub which makes travelling throughout Italy easy breezy and affordable. Third, it is still Italy; meaning the food, wine, and espresso are something of another world. It’s safe to say we will be buying an espresso machine as a “to us from us” Christmas gift.

Upon arrival from the airport, we were very quickly reminded of home. Hello humidity. For the prior four months, we’d been spoiled with a relatively dry climate but was very clearly over. We lugged our backpacks into a taxi and off we went to our Airbnb. For now, I’ll spare the details about insane Italian driving, but I will say that for stretches we drove on the wrong side of the road and seemed to play chicken with some large trucks as we dodged around less “slow” vehicles. Maybe it was a good thing jet lag dulled our senses.

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Piazza del Plebiscito

When we arrived, we were greeted by our host, Clara, who showed us around our new temporary home. Everything was wonderful, however we quickly realized that we’d apparently we missed checking the “air conditioning” box on Airbnb’s site when booking. Smh. Clara asked if we were hungry since we got in so late and intrigued us by saying the current best pizza in Naples was just a quick walk from the building, 50 Kalo. We must have looked really exhausted because she drove us there and tried to get us a table. But as you could probably guess, there was a huge wait it being the best pizza in Naples and all. So Clara pointed across the street to her favorite everyday pizza place called Pasquels. We marched on over and were sat right away. We ordered a bottle of wine for $6, caprese salad, zuppa di pesce and our first Neapolitan pizza which was a twist on the margarita classic except subbing creamy, delicious burrata for mozzarella. My goodness it was amazing and not just because we were exhausted and jet-lagged. The fresh ingredients mixed with it’s perfectly thin, toasty, chewy crust was just what pizza dreams are made of.

Although the food was completely hitting the spot, it was actually the staff who truly made our night so memorable. Everyone was so friendly and very eager to talk us via their Google translate app. They spoke, google translated. We spoke, google translated. It was quite a scene with us all clamoring to speak into the phone and laughing when the translation was completely obscure. They asked about popular Netflix shows and if certain documentaries (Pizza Bomber) were true, why we were in Naples, and what life was like in America. The night ended up being one of our favorites during our time in Naples as we had found our neighborhood late night spot for great pizza, good wine and new friends.

The following days, we walked mini-marathons to get oriented with the area and devoured various homemade pastas. Frutti di mare (mussels, prawns, clams, octopus, calamari mixed with a light fresh tomato sauce and fresh pasta) quickly proved to be our favorite. It’s nearly impossible to go wrong with this dish in Italy and we must have eaten it 10 times.

Aside from eating, we dedicated our first few days to finding a coworking space and a gym. ProFighting Napoli was a pretty awesome find and a 5-minute walk to our apartment. It was a fighting gym with killer cross-training classes that made us regret stopping working out the prior months. We got to know the trainers and worked our asses off 4 times a week. It provided us with a structure and much needed accountability in a city with so mouthwatering wine, pasta and pizza.

As far as finding a coworking space, well, to put it bluntly, it was a major fail. There weren’t any coworking spaces near us and we weren’t quite confident driving a motorbike in Napoli’s crazy streets. One day, we did make the trek to the closest co-working space, however between its 45-minute commute there, and the fact that it was located IN a daycare adjacent to train tracks… we quickly decided we’d just work from our Airbnb for the month. All in all, working at home was fine, but the experience made it a new necessity for our future Aibnbs to be close to a GOOD coworking space.

Once we nailed down gym and a place to work, the rest of our four weeks were spent exploring Naples and far beyond to Orvieto, Tuscany, Capri, Ischia, and Sorrento. We told you public transport was clutch! More on those excursions and our guest visitors to come soon.

Okay, one more pizza pic to hold you over.
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Granada Part 1: Land of Tapas, Alhambra and Hammam

Charming, walkable, Alhambra, flamenco dancing, caves, Darro River, 45 minutes from the coast, and oh yes… and free delicious tapas with every drink. There is so much to love and appreciate about Granada that three weeks wasn’t enough so we decided to stay a whole month.

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That glorious thing behind us is Alhambra

Granada oozes Spanish culture, history, a rich food scene and friendly people. I especially was looking forward to this leg of our trip because I speak a solid amount of Spanish and if one thing has been limiting us on our travels, it’s when we don’t know the language well enough to communicate (on a basic level). That being said, Granada is in a region of Spain called Andalusia and we very quickly learned that Andalusia is known for its distinct and fluid accent, aka very difficult for me to understand. Although I was able to limp us along the first few days, my drive to learn the language better was intensified after not being able to communicate as well as I had hoped. After some googling, I enrolled in an intense 2-week program with ImSol, which consisted of 1.5 hours per day of spoken Spanish classes for conversation comprehension. My class was small (3-4 people) and completely in Spanish, zero English crutches. After two weeks, it did help slightly with my confidence to just speak as well as my acclimation to the speed and style in which the people in Granada speak. If anything, the classes and time in Granada ignited the drive in me to learn Spanish fluently because being able to communicate in another language opens up that many more people to communicate with and learn from.

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Our view along the Darro River on our daily walk home to our AirBnB

Tapas, tapas, tapas. We all know the word and I’m sure visions of delicious, small shareable plates are flooding your mind. However, tapas in Granada and Andalusia as a whole are special because this is where they originated. The OG of tapa culture. Although many explanations exist, we learned the term originally derived from a story where a piece of meat was promptly used to cover the King’s glass of wine to prevent insects and sand from getting in, an edible ‘tapa’ or topper. In Andalusia, tapas are gratis, or free, with every round of drinks be it alcoholic or not. We also learned thanks to the bloggers of the great internet, that tapas get better when you stay at the same restaurant or bodega for multiple rounds. Our 2nd and 3rd tapas were often so delicious we would play a game guessing how much it would cost in America, often $8-$12 per tapa in our minds WITHOUT the drinks. Not to mention good local wine is only 2-4 euro!

As you can imagine we did lots of tapa research… and also joined a gym. We probably only paid for a “real dinner” a total of 5-6 times in the month. Tapa crawling was a way of life.

  • Adams favorite tapa was at La Botillería: Veal pot roast and vegetables (3rd tapa)
  • My favorite tapa was also at La Botillería: Beef slider (2nd tapa)
  • Our favorite tapa close to our apartment was at La Hermosa, a brewery making a delicious beer called Sacromonte: huge and fresh homemade potato crisps, the *best* olives, and cured meat cubes with freshly made bread

Okay, now on to one of the most beautiful wonders of the city. Without a doubt, the most notable attraction in Granada is Alhambra, which I am embarrassed to say we didn’t know about before arriving which is a damn shame because we would have done a major history dig. If you haven’t heard of this majestic palace either, stop right now and pay a visit to Google images. Alhambra is absolutely jaw-dropping. It’s an impeccably preserved Moorish castle from the 9th century with more handcrafted detail than you could ever imagine. Not to mention its fascinating history of daughters locked in towers, secret caves, Turkish baths, and various dramatic conquests. Unlike most monuments or castles, Alhambra is in its own category. Adam and I spent about 4+ hours wandering around the massive complex admiring the attention to detail, security measures, grandiose and ingenious design. I could write an entire blog dedicated to Alhambra… and will if I ever get caught up on blogging.

Another great experience we indulged in during our time in Granada was the Hammam, or Turkish Baths. Now since these are private baths, I don’t have pictures because that would be weird, so I’ll have to use my words to paint a picture. However, if my words aren’t enough you could also visit their website which is completely worth it. In a lot of ways, the baths mimicked Alhambra with the tile work and attention to detail. I was really thankful we visited Alhambra before the baths as it gave us a richer experience because we knew more about the reason for the baths and style of design.

Upon arrival for our 10pm soak, called “emerge”, we were led to a calming waiting room thoughtfully decorated with exotic Turkish design touches and helped ourselves to mint tea in a beautiful ornate silver kettle, you know, to start the relaxing process. Then a staff member took each one of us back to our respected dressing rooms with little slippers over our shoes, where we walked through curtains of flowy linen with dim lighting, earthy scents, and tranquil music. Once changed, we entered the baths, yes with bathing suits. Historical and more traditional Turkish baths we learned were sans suits so there were no determining factors of class or hierarchy; everyone equal as God made them.

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The dreamy Hammam waiting room

There were roughly 30 people allowed in the baths at once for a 90-minute soak. Although that might seem like a lot, it never felt crowded because there were multiple baths and rooms; one warm, two hot, one cold, steam room, a hot stone to lay on, showers, and one room to just lay and pour water on yourself if it suited you. There were also hundreds of candles and delicious tea in more ornate silver kettles. I really liked the kettles if you can’t tell by now. Adam particularly liked the cold bath. And when I say cold, think ice bath. I was reluctant to ease into the frigid water myself, but once in, it really made you feel alive. Like every single nerve ending was electrified. The whole experience was incredibly relaxing and felt delightfully indulgent, despite its modest price. Hammam rules.

Okay, clearly we loved Granada because this blog is long and I haven’t even got to cooking paella in Malaga, hiking Los Cahorros, our co-working space, drool-worthy Iberian ham, or our weekend beach getaway to Nerja yet! Look out for Granda Part Two coming soon!

Cheers!

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Now that I have you drooling with our cooking adventure making paella — stay tuned for Part 2!

Viva la Vida en Barcelona

So let’s pretend we’re dancing in the street, in Barcelona
Come on and dance with me in Barcelona
Drinking Sangria, I just want to be in Barcelona

Ed Sheeran had it right. I don’t think its possible to ever get sick of Barcelona. Marvellous beaches, long pedestrian promenades, vibrant street life, dramatic architecture, an efficient metro system, *phenomenal* food, and a neighborhood to fit any personality. Barcelona is a multi-layered, culturally rich city you can just get lost in, in the best way possible.

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Montserrat Beauty

One reason we were so excited for this leg of the trip is that we were meeting up with our two good friends, Kelly and Cory. They had planned a 10-day trip which happened to time up perfectly with our time in Spain! We had been missing our friends from home, so seeing them renewed our spirits and warmed our hearts. Our first day meeting them was without a doubt our favorite day in Barcelona. It was a beautiful sunny day as the four of us wandered around the beach and hidden streets of a fishing neighborhood called Barceloneta. We stopped to snack on Iberian ham, patatas bravas, little fried seafood, and of course ice cold, bubbly cava. By happenstance, we even stumbled on a lively festival that weaved through all the streets of Barceloneta. Although we still don’t know the exact meaning behind the animated festival, we deducted it had something having to do with ancient fisherman selling their fish for meat… or so I translated from a young girl describing it in Catalon. *Side note: the Catalon language spoke it is quite different than Spanish, so I was a little out of my league with communication.* There were hundreds of colorful dancers, costumes and musicians belonging to different themed groups. It was a wild time and continued late into the night, keeping the fun bar high for the day. We kept wondering, soaking up the atmosphere and ended up finishing the day with some seriously delicious paella at Arrosseria L’arròs. Cory and Adam’s choice of a squid ink variety won us all over. Drooling just thinking about it.

The following day, the four of us took off on a wine/cava tour we had planned months in advance. We hopped on a bus with a small group and made our way to our first stop, Finca Can’Estella, a small boutique winery built in the late 18th century.  Aside from being so quaint and charming, we learned a lot about cava and got to enjoy our first sip in a candlelit, historic stone vat listening to the almost musical sounds of the bubbles. After the rest of the tour, we tasted 3 additional cavas paired with tapas of bread and tomato (pan con tomate), various hams, olives, tortilla española, and local chocolate, among many others. The tapas just kept coming! With full bellies, we hopped on the bus and continued on to the second winery, Oller del Mas Cellar. This was also a very beautiful setting as it is located in a former medieval castle with a 1000-year history of winemaking. You could literally feel the history embedded in this place. We tasted 3 different organic wines and snacked on an assortment of cheeses… all delicious because honestly, everything is delicious in Spain. It was such a fun experience sipping our way throughout the day with great friends, local wines, authentic tapas and excellent tour guides.

The rest of our time in Barcelona was a little more balanced with work :). Kelly and Cory wen to explore Ibiza for a few days and we found a nice co-working space just a 15-minute walk from our AirBnB with welcoming owners and great coffee, called CoCo Coffice. We bought a 5-day pass on Barcelona’s metro and zipped all around beneath the city with ease. Travelling on such an excellent and efficient metro system really made us realize why Barcelona is able to thrive as such an expansive, diverse and desirable city.

Other highlights of Barcelona that have to be mentioned include:

  • listening and dancing to live jazz at the Harlem Club
  • the tour of La Sagrada Familia
  • sitting in Plaça de Sol, located in the awesome Gracia neighborhood, with all the area’s bohemian locals eating pizza by the slice and sipping on our cava we bought from the wine tour
  • meeting up with some locals for a day of very windy beach volleyball
  • the best tapas we had in Barcelona at Samsara, also in the Gracia neighborhood
  • our goodbye dinner with Cory and Kelly at Cera 23 (thanks again you two!)
  • a day trip to stunning Montserrat 
  • the drool-worthy, vibrant market of La Boquería
  • wondering around the Gothic Quarter
  • snail tapas (don’t knock ’em till you try ’em) and rendezvousing with my sister’s friend Kim and her husband Dink at Los Caracoles

Looking back now, we treated Barcelona, unlike the other cities we’ve been in thus far. Since we only had 10 days, we ‘lived it up’ more than we typically would have, indulging in the food scene more frequently, splurging on touristic adventures, using the metro instead of renting bicycles, and spitting time between a hotel and AirBnB. All in all, it was a fantastic time and Adam and I both think it’s a city we could have easily spent a month in and really sunk our teeth into. There are so many neighborhoods with their own distinct charm, so if you plan on going, do your research! Also, contrary to popular belief, Barcelona doesn’t have to be an expensive city for a vacation. Again with a little research, there are a lot of affordable options for accommodations, dining and entertainment. Barcelona is a must see that I would love to experience again, as the city has so much to offer that it would be a completely unique experience each time.

 

 

 

Porto, Portugal: Our Highlight Reel

The phrase “time flies when you’re having fun” exists for a reason. Our time in Portugal flew by so fast that I am just now sitting here in Barcelona writing and reminiscing about how magical Porto was. We had 23 days total in Portugal and finally found a much need ‘groove’ after bouncing around so much in South Africa. Let it be known that it is harder than anticipated to balance exploring a new city, working, sticking to a budget, exercise… oh and blogging.

We had decided on Porto as a home base after a lot of research that positioned it as a blue-collar city where the people are friendly, hard working and very proud of their city. A city with more grit than its shinier cousin, Lisbon, with an up and coming food scene that rivals it. Our AirBnB was actually across the river from Porto in a charming fishing village called Villa Nova de Gaia. We chose Gaia for a few reasons: a little cheaper, some of the best fresh seafood in Porto, and it was on the marina with great sunset views. Technically we were in Gaia’s quaint neighborhood of Afurada which was the kind of place where it was clear everyone knew everyone and there was a tangible pride and local culture. Since I somehow don’t have a picture,  close your eyes and imagine:

…small narrow stone streets lined with modest yet beautifully tiled buildings, family run cafes every few feet, sweet grandmas with calf length skirts, tall wool socks and slippers ironing on the sidewalk, FC Porto flags and scarves hanging from the windows, stray cats sunbathing and lurking at every corner, kids playing and riding their bikes, old men smoking and yelling at the fútbol game on tv, drying laundry ruffling on the balconies bringing a clean scent to the air, and fresh fish continuously grilling on every corner.

Okay now open your eyes. Wasn’t it beautiful?

Let’s dive right into our highlight reel. Here are our favorite moments from our time in Portugal, in no particular order.

  • Renting bikes for 3 weeks for $200 euro total. This not only made our commute much faster and cheaper but was passive exercise and allowed us to experience the city on a street level. Oh and the view along the boardwalk…. sigh
  • Adam’s co-working space Porto i/o. Super friendly community, a stellar view, affordable, and good coffee.
  • Adam’s fun and cheap lunches with co-workers
  • Shopping at the neighborhood market than having a sunset picnic of cured meat, fresh bread, passion fruit, local cheese, and local wine. Oh and then a cute dog joined.
  • Finding our way to Cervejaria Gazela, a local spot Anthony Bourdain visited on his trip to Porto. The food: cachorrinhos (cheese, hotdog-like meat, special sauce, and bread all panini’ed pressed to perfection. The drink: cold, ‘pressured’ (on tap) Superbock. We also met a friend here, Pedro, that I’m sure helped us because we looked lost. Pedro ordered for us, found us seats and promised to take us to explore “real” Porto… see #13
  • A traditional Fado three-course dinner arranged by our AirBnB host. Fado happens during dinner when someone powerfully signs a stream of melancholy songs with a small group of musicians.
  • Biking home from Matosinhos and discovering a truly perfect outdoor Hawaiian themed restaurant with lounge chairs on a platform right off the sand, with a view of the ocean and a bottle of vinho verde for $9 euro (young sparkling white wine). We had two and smuggled ½ of the second home 🙂
  • A day cruise up the Douro River and train ride back
  • A visit and tasting to the port winery Real Companhia Velha. We paid more for the tour and tasting than we typically would have, but it was well worth it with a private tour of the cellars, bonus tastings from our guide and a delicious cheese, olive, and nut board. We LOVED this.
  • A weekend trip to Lisbon where we rented a car and drove down the coast
  • Stopping in Nazare on the way to Lisbon to video my stepdad Art from the biggest wave in the world. The surf was choppy and kind of flat this particular day but still very cool and a perfectly cute town (so cute we stopped on our way back to Porto for lunch)
  • A day trip to Braga with friends from the co-working space. One friend drove us all to this **MAGICAL** area by the river with volleyball courts, a bar, architectural relics, a beautiful bridge, and people enjoying every bit of it. This might have been one of our favorite days.
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    Braga’s magical area by the river

  • Going out on the town with our friend Pedro and his buddy. They took us to an area with no tourists and we had a ball of a time until about 3am when we just got too tired for any more fun : )
  • Watching a huge street racing event, cars were getting major air and the crowd (the entire city) was going wild
  • Eating at Ramiro in Lisbon. We were (literally) crushing crab with hammers and eating WAY too much because it was. that. good. The entertainment of the servers reaching in a tank for lobsters was quite a sight too.
  • Going to the Palace of Sintra and walking all around the city. We had some marvellous tapas and sangria at Tascantinga and got our vertical steps in for the day.
  • Eating at Casa Guedes: where we randomly discovered while waiting for an uber what we believe to be the best pernil sandwich in all of Porto. Freshly carved marinated pork, local sheep’s cheese, wheat bun and a guy slapping them together barehanded and focused. About as local as it gets
  • Adam’s euro haircut and fresh shave at Barbas Shop.
  • Dancing the night away with Dutch friends we met in Lisbon
  • Spending Adam’s 34th birthday in Porto! Pre-dinner cocktails sponsored by Matt and Julie Yung and a delicious dinner at Ar de Rio.
  • Working at my comfy coffee shop for the bulk of my work days, 7groasters
  • Traditional Portuguese food: fresh fish always grilled right outside, potatoes, onion + tomato + olive + lettuce salad, rice, a bottle of wine. Our favorite was right by our AirBnb called Armazem do Peixe.
  • Pastel de nata! Heavenly Portuguese pastry
  • Early morning sand volleyball workout and espressos on the beach
  • Riding the boat taxi for $2 euro, $3 with your bike

Wow Wow Cape Town

The fact that it has taken me 2 whole weeks to get this blog out is a testament to how much we are LOVING Cape Town. It’s been an impressive first stop on our adventure and with as many places that Adam and I have been fortunate enough to visit, nothing quite compares to this vibrant and culturally diverse city hugging the coast. With two and a half weeks under our belts, we already have a laundry list of observations that make this place unique.

Landscape + Location
If you haven’t been following our Instagram, which you should do, you’ll need to start by googling “Cape Town”. Instantly your eyes should widen with the glorious imagery filling your google image search of Table Mountain, Lion’s Head, the sprawling city at its base and beautiful blue oceans. From any point near and around the city as well as its various neighborhoods, these iconic land masses have a major presence, making you feel very tiny. And oh my gawd are they stunning. So stunning that we hiked both within our first week here. Blog on those climbing adventures coming next and I promise it won’t take 2 weeks. Even as I sit here at our favorite neighborhood coffee shop, Melissa’s, enjoying a double flat white (latte equivalent?) and finally writing this blog, my backdrop is Her Majesty, Table Mountain. You should also know as we recently found out that Table Mountain is one of the “New 7 Wonders of Nature“.

In an attempt to keep this blog a manageable reading length, I won’t go into detail YET about the stretching vineyards, luscious forests and gorgeous coastlines, but it has to be said that the physical landscape of this region is nothing short of awe-inspiring.

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Multi-tasking at our favorite local coffee shop, Melissa’s

Diversity
On our first hike up Lion’s Head, we heard people passing by speaking Italian, German, Spanish, South African English, American English, Afrikaans (basically Dutch), and a few others that were indistinguishable. At first, I was thinking wow, all these people are here on vacation or ‘holiday’ as they say locally. But the more time we’ve spent mingling, the more we’ve realized South Africa has a huge population of people that have moved here from other countries, some just at least until their visas expire.

It’s also been interesting to note that many we meet identify with multiple nationalities. One morning on beauuuutiful Camps Bay Beach, we were playing volleyball with a whole group of people currently living in South Africa. However, they described themselves as “South African and German”, “Italian and South African”, or “Dutch and South African”. Maybe that is a way they distinguish they aren’t tourists or maybe they all feel as though they identify with being South African in the same way they identify with their own home country. Regardless, it’s been intriguing and a hell of a lot of fun to meet all these worldly people. It’s also quite impressive that everyone speaks multiple languages… which is really encouraging me to go back to hitting the Spanish books before we get to Spain. Nesicito aprender mas pronto!

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Adam’s impressive jump serve and our impressive multi-national friends

Locally Sourced Food + Cost of Living
Yea, yea, we’ve been eating a lot… but we’ve also been working out a lot too, but we all know the food is prettier to look at than our morning circuits in the park. The food scene here in “The Mother City” is outrageously delicious and beautiful, not to mention half the price as in the states! Now I know every local is hoping their currency, the Rand, continues to strengthen, but as of today, our dollar goes FAR (12:1). Wine = 40-60 R is normal at a nice restaurant ($3.33-$5) and on happy hour it dips to 25-30 R ($2-$3)! A locally sourced, good meal = 60-100 R ($5-$8.50). Adam has also been stalking the various real state advertisements and those are about half of what you would expect too. As you can probably guess, we’re dreaming (plotting?) of buying a place here on the regular.

One more thing I did want to add that has been pretty striking is that nearly all the food at the grocery stores is LOCAL. Pineapples, bananas, meat, eggs, cheese, olive oil, wine, packaged food, jerky (called biltong here) – it’s all from South Africa! A testament to the rich abundance of the country’s landscape.

Security
I’m pretty sure the only time I’ve seen high voltage wire is in Jurassic Park, but here it’s as common as taking an Uber (which is the main method of transport). High voltage wire along with, massive spiked security gates and barbed wire encompass nearly every residence, be it a stunning mansion or a simple condo complex like our AirBnB. As an example, we have 4 keys to get into our apartment which is inarguably one of the best areas of Cape Town – The Garden District. One that unlocks the front spiked security gate and interior iron gate, another that unlocks our apartment door’s iron security gate, and two additional keys that unlock the locks on our front door. It takes 5 minutes just to get in and out. What this says to us as visitors is that security is an issue and locals would rather be safe than sorry. However, I can’t help but think that this apparent need for intense security only further visually and physically divides the people that South Africa is working to unite.

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The view of our temporary ‘Captonian’ home and just the first layer of high voltage security

There is so much more that I want to cover but I want to save some juicy details and exciting days for posts to come. However — one thing I don’t want to ignore in this first post because there will be a blog dedicated to it coming up is that the socio-economic divides in South Africa are something we have never witnessed. As we’ve heard many times from locals, “Cape Town isn’t South Africa” and our visit to one of the adjacent townships this week not only proved that but changed us probably forever. This country is stunning, exciting, and amazing yes… but it has a complex and horrid history that has scared its infrastructure and affected culture in a way that is really hard to put to words.

Until next time, cheers and keep liking our Instagrams : )
Chels and Adam